A Republican judge in New York confessed recently to stealing the underwear of his 23-year-old neighbor on a regular basis. Ring of Fire’s Mike Papantonio and Farron Cousins discuss this issue.

Transcript:

*This transcript was generated by a third-party transcription software company, so please excuse any typos.

Mike Papantonio:             A Republican judge in New York, crazy story, I mean, he confessed recently to stealing the underwear of his 23-year-old neighbor on a regular basis. Breaking into her house, stealing her underwear. She apparently worked for him at one point. She happened to be living nextdoor with her parents. He breaks into her house, steals her underwear. He plans on pleading not guilty in his upcoming trial. This is a judge. What’s your reaction to this?

Farron Cousins:                  There’s so much wrong with this story. First of all, yeah, he absolutely says, “Yeah, I 100% did this to this poor girl.” And it was used underwear too.

Mike Papantonio:             Yeah.

Farron Cousins:                  That’s even worse. But, he admitted that, “Yeah, I did this and I know her. She worked for me. But, I’m pleading not guilty because I was a.” What did he say, you know? “I was driven by urges.”

Mike Papantonio:             Urges. Yeah, I think he should-

Farron Cousins:                  And so this urge that I had, apparently, for Mr. Judge here, Robert Cicale, those urges trump the law, I guess, for this guy whose job it is to interpret the law.

Mike Papantonio:             Oh, yeah. Okay. Here it is. He’s a judge. He’s married. He has three children. 23-year-old girl living nextdoor with her parents, okay? Has worked for him in the past. And he says, “Well, I just had this urge.” Well, you know, that’s part of the criminal conduct analysis. People have urges to kill people. Well, they go to prison for it. This guy could go to prison for 15 years. That urge was so great. I mean, he really needs 15 years of psychological counseling. But the truth of this story is that, when you drill down on this, and his defense, this very interesting defense, “Well, I had an urge.” Well, urge is the equivalent, I couldn’t keep myself from taking a gun and shooting somebody I didn’t like. That’s an urge.

Farron Cousins:                  Right.

Mike Papantonio:             So I mean, to hear a judge talking like that is-

Farron Cousins:                  Well, what funny though is that I’m sure that judge has heard that argument before-

Mike Papantonio:             Of course.

Farron Cousins:                  … while hearing cases because that is typically what separates the criminal mentality from the average, law-abiding citizen, is that, yes, look trust me, everybody can have any kind of urge out there. It’s your decision whether or not to act on it that determines whether or not you break the law.

Mike Papantonio:             It’s what hold society together.

Farron Cousins:                  You’re exactly-

Mike Papantonio:             It’s what keeps us away from total anarchy, everybody just acting out their urge.

Mike Papantonio is an American attorney and television and radio talk show host. He is past president of The National Trial Lawyers, the most prestigious trial lawyer association in America; and is one of the few living attorneys inducted into the Trial Lawyer Hall of Fame. He hosts the international television show "America's Lawyer"; and co-hosts Ring of Fire Radio, a nationally syndicated weekly radio program, with Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. and Sam Seder.