Just three short days since we all learned that Donald Trump would be our dear leader, and the DNC is preparing to implode on itself as it fights over who will steer the ship from here on out.

A purge of leadership was certainly called for, and because current chair Donna Brazile was only serving as interim chair for the remainder of the election, that spot is wide open and waiting for a progressive liberal to take control.

Though Senator Bernie Sanders has enthusiastically endorsed Minnesota Congressman Keith Ellison for the position, Ellison is not the only one in the running – and we can expect the competition for the key spot to heat up.

Since the announcement of Ellison’s nomination broke on Thursday, several other noted Democrats have raised their hand in interest as well. Among those is failed presidential candidate Martin O’Malley and failed presidential candidate from yesteryear Howard Dean.

Also fighting for the spot, according to Politico, are:

“New Hampshire Democratic Party Chairman and DNC vice chair Raymond Buckley — who runs the Association of State Democratic Chairs — South Carolina Chairman Jaime Harrison, and House Democratic Caucus Chairman Xavier Becerra are said to be open to bids of their own, fielding calls from other DNC members about their interest. . . DNC vice chair R.T. Rybak, the former mayor of Minneapolis who nearly got the role under Barack Obama, and retiring New York Rep. Steve Israel — a former Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee chair — are also in the mix.”

That’s a lot of hands who are ready to stir the pot.

Of course, at this point, Ellison is poised to be the most likely selection after he received an endorsement from Sanders, support from Chuck Schumer, and kind words from Elizabeth Warren. There is currently a petition being circulated by Sanders encouraging Americans to voice their support for Ellison.

Ellison, who is one of two Muslims in congress, was heavily supported by Sanders during his congressional race. He also introduced Sanders at the Democratic National Convention in the summer.

In the coming days, the Democratic party will need to separate the establishment cronies from the legitimate, inspiring fighters. If the Democratic party expects to survive past this failure of an election, it needs to turn the now corporate party into something wholly unrecognizable.